AI ReWired: How communities are using AI to Support Social and Environmental Justice

PROJECT SUMMARY

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AI ReWired: How communities are using AI to Support Social and Environmental Justice

Focus Areas: News & Media, Mobilities, Health
Research Program: People
Status: Completed

The future we are being sold is an automated wonderland, a techtopia that will use algorithms to heal our ecological crisis and restore social justice. A dream world where we enjoy endless innovation and growth in sparkling smart cities, where we are liberated from the burden of work, where the future of our species lies in billionaire funded missions to Mars.

But what if this promise sounds more like a nightmare?
What are the alternatives?

The AI ReWired project uses co-creative documentary film practice to uncover how diverse communities utilise AI systems to protect the environment, support social justice and promote fairness in their communities.

RESEARCHERS

Jeni Lee

Jeni Lee

Lead Investigator,
Monash University

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ADM+S Chief Investigator Sarah Pink

Prof Sarah Pink

Chief Investigator,
Monash University

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Dr Damiano Spina

Dr Damiano Spina

Associate Investigator,
RMIT University

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Yolande Strengers

Prof Yolande Strengers

Associate Investigator,
Monash University

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Georgia Van Toorn

Dr Georgia van Toorn

Associate Investigator,
UNSW

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Thao Phan

Dr Thao Phan

Research Fellow,
Monash University

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Emma Quilty

Dr Emma Quilty

Affiliate,
Monash University

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Melissa Gregg

De Mel Gregg

Senior Industry Fellow,
RMIT

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Nonie May

Dr Nonie May

Project support,
Monash University

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Humans, Machines, and Decision Responsibility

PROJECT SUMMARY

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Humans, Machines, and Decision Responsibility

Focus Areas: News & Media, Social Services, Mobilities, Health
Research Program: Institutions, Machines
Status: Active

Automated decision-making provokes a range of anxieties around transparency, equality, and accountability. A key response has been the call to ‘re-humanise’ automated decisions, with the hope that human control of automated systems might defend human values from mindless technocracy. Regulation of automated decision-making and AI often embeds this form of human centrism by prescribing a ‘human in the loop’ and the need for automated decisions to be ‘explained’. These requirements are central elements of the risk-based approaches AI regulation currently in development.

Despite their intuitive appeal, empirical research is revealing the limitations and complexities of these approaches. AI explanations sometimes provide little that is useful for decision subjects or decision makers, and risk distracting from more meaningful interrogation of why decisions are made. A human in the loop sometimes functions as a rubber stamp for automated decisions, cleaving accountability away from the true sites of decision responsibility.

This project seeks to generate better understandings of the functions, capacities, and normative role of humans within automated decision systems. It will investigate the ways that automated systems ought to explain or be explained to humans within decision processes, and how elements of decision-making including processes, responsibility, authority, and what counts as a decision itself, are fragmented and redistributed between humans, machines, and organisations. The goal is to generate empirical knowledge of how automated systems, humans, and organisations interact in different contexts when making decisions, and to move past outdated understandings of decisions-making that are hindering effective governance of automation in new decision contexts.

RESEARCHERS

Jake Goldenfein

Dr Jake Goldenfein

Lead Investigator,
University of Melbourne

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ADM+S Associate Director Jean Burgess

Prof Jean Burgess

Chief Investigator,
QUT

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Paul Henman headshot

Prof Paul Henman

Chief Investigator,
University of Queensland

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ADM+S Chief Investigator Christopher Leckie

Prof Chris Leckie

Chief Investigator,
University of Melbourne

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Prof Flora Salim

Prof Flora Salim

Chief Investigator,
UNSW

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Distinguished Professor Julian Thomas

Prof Julian Thomas

Chief Investigator,
RMIT University

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Kim Weatherall

Prof Kim Weatherall

Chief Investigator,
University of Sydney

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Henry Fraser

Dr Henry Fraser

Research Fellow,
QUT

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Dr Awais Hameed Khan

Research Fellow,
UQ

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Fan Yang

Dr Fan Yang

Research Fellow,
University of Melbourne

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Libby Young

Libby Young

PhD Student
University of Sydney

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Joe Brailsford

Joe Brailsford

Affiliate
University of Melbourne

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Fabio Mattioli

Dr Fabio Mattioli

Affiliate
University of Melbourne

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Christopher O'Neill

Dr Chris O’Neil

Affiliate,
Deakin University

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Ash Watson

Dr Ash Watson

Affiliate,
UNSW

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Australian Digital Inclusion Index

PROJECT SUMMARY

Australian Digital Inclusion Index

Focus Areas: News & Media, Social Services, Mobilities, Health
Status: Active

Digital inclusion is about ensuring that all Australians can access and use digital technologies effectively. We are experiencing an accelerating digital transformation in many aspects of economic and social life. Our premise is that everyone should have the opportunity to benefit from digital technologies: to manage their health, access education and services, participate in cultural activities, organise their finances, follow news and media, and connect with family, friends, and the wider world.

The Australian Digital Inclusion Index (ADII or “Index”) uses survey data to measure digital inclusion across three dimensions of Access, Affordability and Digital Ability. We explore how these dimensions vary across the country and across different social groups.

In partnership with Telstra and through biennial data collections presented through reports and data visualisation dashboards, the ADII is capturing and communicating the evolving state of digital inclusion in Australia. This is complemented by aligned sub-projects with local, state and federal government departments and community partners to drill down into specific digital inclusion challenges for social groups or geographical regions of interest.

A detailed measure of digital inclusion for Australia allows us to identify the critical barriers to inclusion. These may be related to accessing networks, the costs of devices or data, or skills and literacies. Through these measures, the Index shapes digital equity policy and initiatives, research, and practice to increase digital inclusion in Australia.

Visit the ADII website 

MORE INFORMATION

The Australian Digital Inclusion Index uses data from the ADM+S project, Mapping the Digital Gap. Learn more from the project brief below.

PUBLICATIONS

Uncovering digital divide in the western parkland city

Uncovering the digital divide in the Western Parkland City

ADM+S, Telstra, NSW Government, Sydney’s Parkland Councils

Report

Measuring Australia’s Digital Divide: 2023 Australian Digital Inclusion Index

ADM+S and Telstra

Report

Telstra Connected Students: Lessons for Digital Inclusion, 2022

ADM+S and Telstra

Report

Australian Digital Inclusion Index: Measuring Digital Inclusion in North-East Victorian SMEs Summary Findings Brief, 2022

Thomas, J., Parkinson, S., et al.

Report

2021 Digital Inclusion Index

ADM+S and Telstra

Report

RESEARCHERS

ADM+S Chief Investigator Anthony McCosker

Prof Anthony McCosker

Chief Investigator,
Swinburne University

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Distinguished Professor Julian Thomas

Prof Julian Thomas

Chief Investigator,
RMIT University

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Jenny Kennedy

Assoc Prof Jenny Kennedy

Associate Investigator,
RMIT University

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Sharon Parkinson

Dr Sharon Parkinson

Associate Investigator,
Swinburne University

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Daniel Featherstone

Dr Daniel Featherstone

Senior Research Fellow,
RMIT University

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Lyndon Ormond-Parker

Assoc Prof Lyndon Ormond-Parker

Senior Research Fellow,
RMIT University

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Kieran Hegarty

Dr Kieran Hegarty

Research Fellow,
RMIT University

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RESEARCH SUPPORT

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Lucy Valenta

Research Coordinator,
RMIT University

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PARTNERS

Telstra

Telstra

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Is Pricing Discriminatory: Testing Automated Decision-Making Systems in Online Insurance Markets

PROJECT SUMMARY

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Is Pricing Discriminatory: Testing Automated Decision-Making Systems in Online Insurance Markets

Focus Areas: News & Media, Social Services, Mobilities, Health
Research Program: Data
Status: Active

Advances in data-driven and AI systems are driving significant transformation in the emerging insurance technology (insurtech) sector.

This project investigates the extent to which automated decision-making systems impact the provision of consumer insurance via pricing algorithms which may produce unfair outcomes for particular subsets of society by engaging in proxy and price discrimination.

RESEARCHERS

Kelly Lewis

Dr Kelly Lewis

Lead Investigator,
Monash University

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Mark Andrejevic

Prof Mark Andrejevic

Chief Investigator,
Monash University

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Daniel Angus

Prof Daniel Angus

Chief Investigator,
QUT

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Kim Weatherall

Prof Kim Weatherall

Chief Investigator,
University of Sydney

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Zofia Bednarz

Dr Zofia Bednarz

Associate Investigator,
University of Sydney

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Jathan Sadowski

Dr Jathan Sadowski

Associate Investigator,
Monash University

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ADM+S professional staff Abdul Obeid

Dr Abdul Obeid

Data Engineer,
QUT

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PARTNERS

CHOICE

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Consumer Policy Research Centre Logo

Consumer Policy Research Centre

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Testbed Australia

PROJECT SUMMARY

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Testbed Australia

Focus Areas: Transport and Mobilities
Research Program: People

Australia has a long history as a site for scientific experimentation. The Australian land and its people have, over the course of its colonial history, been continuously treated as a “low risk” site for the empirical testing of high-risk theories and procedures.

Most recently, Big Tech corporations have begun to experiment with the country’s potential as test bed for new features and products. The streaming service Spotify used Australia as a testing site for its then experimental Discover Weekly playlist. The dating app Tinder piloted features like “Tinder Social” and “Super Like” in the Australian market before releasing it globally. And Facebook trialled its 2018 upvote downvote feature first on users based in Australia and New Zealand.

While techniques like prototyping, beta testing, and other forms of testing “in the wild” are common practices, the impacts of such testing on communities and environments are under-examined.

This project explores the role of testing, prototyping, trialling and other techniques of controlled experimentation for AI and other automated decision-making systems in Australia.

It focuses on transport and mobilities, investigating techniques of testing for the deployment of automated systems, such as those used in Autonomous vehicle (AVs) and commercial delivery drones.

It brings together expertise in feminist science and technology studies (STS), critical legal studies, and media studies to address questions such as:

  • What are the features of the environment and landscape that make Australia well-suited as a site for testing?
  • Which communities are targets for testing?
  • How does policy and other forms of state discourse contribute to creating an ideal regulatory environment for testing?
  • What are the potential harms and benefits involved?

RESEARCHERS

Thao Phan

Dr Thao Phan

Lead Investigator,
Monash University

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Jake Goldenfein

Dr Jake Goldenfein

Chief Investigator,
University of Melbourne

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Michael Richardson

Assoc Prof Michael Richardson

Associate Investigator,
UNSW

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Automation and Public Space

PROJECT SUMMARY

LiDAR sensing concept

Automation and Public Space

Focus Areas: News and Media, Transport and Mobility, Health, and Social Services
Research Program: Data
Status:
 Active

From delivery drones to digital twins to crowd surveillance, automated decision-making technologies and practices are increasingly impacting public and shared space. This project investigates how automated decision-making systems impact public and shared space via sensors that produce actionable digital simulations, artefacts, and interfaces. Through a mixed methods approach, it will examine current and potential effects of automated decision-making on the form, use, and experience of public space.

Technological development in this area is undergoing rapid change. Delivery via autonomous drone requires sensor-driven navigation systems, but the data and models they produce about public space will likely lead to modulations of that space in response. In urban and environmental governance, ‘digital twins’ are increasingly to monitor environments in real-time, simulate the impact of potential changes, and even implement those changes directly. Technologies such as these are not only increasingly deployed in Australia, but are also invented, designed, and tested here too, often in proximity to defence and defence industries.

Understanding how tools of automated spatiality reconfigure environments and the role of policy and industry in their innovation and uptake will generate new knowledge about a critical point of convergence between public space, technology, defence, and industry with national significance, as well as implications for international jurisdictions facing similar changes and challenges.

Over 3 years commencing in 2022, the project aims to answer the following questions:
• How is space-making automated across different technologies and contexts? What logics, techniques and practices are shared? What are distinct to different contexts?
• How does automated spatiality lead to the reconfiguring of public space?
• How are digital infrastructures, such as unmanned traffic management systems for civilian airspace, imagined, organised, and regulated?
• How do policy settings, industrial demands, and defence priorities shape the development and application of technologies of automated spatiality?

PUBLICATIONS

Andrejevic, M.

Journal article

Biometric Re-bordering: Environmental Control During Pandemic Times, 2022

Andrejevic, M., Volcic, Z.

Journal article

Seeing Like a Border, 2021

Andrejevic, M., Volcic, Z.

Journal article

RESEARCHERS

Michael Richardson

Assoc Prof Michael Richardson

Lead Investigator,
UNSW

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Mark Andrejevic

Prof Mark Andrejevic

Chief Investigator,
Monash University

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Jake Goldenfein

Dr Jake Goldenfein

Chief Investigator,
University of Melbourne

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ADM+S Chief Investigator Anthony McCosker

Prof Anthony McCosker

Chief Investigator,
Swinburne University

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Jathan Sadowski

Dr Jathan Sadowski

Associate Investigator,
Monash University

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Rowan Wilken

Assoc Prof Rowan Wilken

Associate Investigator,
RMIT University

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Kelly Lewis

Dr Kelly Lewis

Research Fellow,
Monash University

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Thao Phan

Dr Thao Phan

Research Fellow,
Monash University

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Zoe Horn

Zoe Horn

Student,
Western Sydney University

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Lauren Kelly

Lauren Kelly

Student,
RMIT University

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Andrew Brooks

Dr Andrew Brooks

Affiliate,
UNSW

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Danielle Hynes

Danielle Hynes

Affiliate,
UNSW

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Christopher O'Neill

Dr Chris O’Neill

Affiliate,
Deakin University

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PARTNERS

OVIC Logo

Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner

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Designing Automated Tools to Support Welfare Rights Advocacy

PROJECT SUMMARY

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Designing Automated Tools to Support Welfare Rights Advocacy

Focus Areas: Social Services
Research Program: Machines
Status: Active

Welfare rights lawyers across Australia advocate for claimants of income support payments (e.g., unemployment benefits, disability support pension, family tax benefit etc.) paid by Services Australia — Centrelink. Claimants rely on welfare payments as a substantive part of their income, and often depend on welfare rights organisations to assist them in disputing decisions by Centrelink. These disputes can range from alleged debt due to overpayment, cessation of payment, or denial of payment altogether.

When engaging a client to support a dispute claim, welfare rights lawyers often submit a Freedom of Information (FOI) request to Centrelink, to access client files. Centrelink provides this information in the form of a large PDF document (colloquially referred to as THE BRICK), which contains hundreds of pages of client data, including case notes and screenshots from Centrelink computers, documents using a lot of system and internal acronyms. Lawyers must then trawl through and make sense of this detailed document, reconstructing the history of a client’s case, while attempting to decipher the decisions made by Centrelink and their rationale. This is a heavy time consuming and onerous process, reducing the actual time a lawyer spends in engaging with their client, and making the legal arguments for the case.

Working closely with welfare rights lawyers (and their teams), advocacy groups, and users of social services — this project aims to collaboratively design, prototype, and pilot an automated data extraction tool to support welfare rights lawyers in making sense of Services Australia (Centrelink) system-generated FOI documents.

This project explores the following research questions:

  1. How can we digitally scaffold and support sense-making of Freedom of Information (FOI) system-generated responses through a data extraction tool outside the government system?
  2. What methods/approaches can facilitate collaborative design of Automated Decision-Making (ADM) support systems in social services with key stakeholders?
  3. How might we reclaim and democratize sense-making/deciphering of government ADM outputs from outside of government systems — designing for controlled activism?
  4. What impact can using an ADM support system, such as the data extraction tool, have on an organisational work flow and capacity of welfare rights lawyers to support their clients?

Key objectives are to:

  • Design, prototype and build an automated data extraction tool to support welfare rights lawyers in sense-making of system-generated FOI documents
  • Involve welfare rights lawyers, advocacy groups, and social service users and professionals in co-design of ADM tools to support such sense-making
  • Evaluate the Implications of the tool on organisational practice and processes

RESEARCHERS

Paul Henman headshot

Prof Paul Henman

Lead Investigator,
University of Queensland

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Terry Carney profil picture

Prof Terry Carney

Associate Investigator,
University of Sydney

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Robert Mullins profile picture

Dr Robert Mullins

Associate Investigator,
University of Queensland

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Awais Hameed Khan profile image

Dr Awais Hameed Khan

Research Fellow,
University of Queensland

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ADM+S professional staff Abdul Obeid

Dr Abdul Obeid

Data Engineer,
QUT

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Dan Trang

Dan Trang

Software Developer,
QUT

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PARTNERS

Economic Justice Australia

Economic Justice of Australia

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Services Australia

Services Australia

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Welfare Rights Centre

Welfare Rights Centre

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Trauma-informed AI: Developing and testing a practical AI audit framework for use in social services

PROJECT SUMMARY

Woman's face with artificial intelligence graphic on right side

Trauma-informed AI: Developing and testing a practical AI audit framework for use in social services

Focus Areas: Social Services
Research Program: Machines
Status: Completed

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is increasingly being used in the delivery of social services. While it offers opportunities for more efficient, effective and personalised service delivery, AI can also generate greater problems, reinforcing disadvantage, generating trauma or re-traumatising service users.

Conducted by a multi-disciplinary research team with extensive expertise in the intersection of social services and digital technology, this project seeks to co-design an innovative AI trauma-informed audit framework to assess the extent to which an AI’s decisions may generate new trauma or re-traumatise.

The value of a trauma-informed AI audit framework is not simply to assess digital technologies after they are built and in operation, but also to inform designs of digital technologies and digitally enabled social services from their inception.

It will be road-tested using multiple case studies of AI use in child/family services, domestic and family violence services, and social security/welfare payments.

PUBLIC RESOURCES

Building a Trauma-Informed Algorithmic Assessment Toolkit

Target audience: Social service organisations

This Toolkit has been designed to assist organisations in their use of automation in service delivery at any stage of their automation journey: ideation; design; development; piloting; deployment or evaluation. While of particular use for social service organisations working with people who may have experienced past trauma, the tool will be beneficial for any organisation wanting to ensure safe, responsible and ethical use of automation and AI.

View toolkit

RESEARCHERS

Paul Henman

Prof Paul Henman

Lead Investigator,
University of Queensland

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ADM+S Investigator Philip Gillingham

Dr Philip Gillingham

Associate Investigator,
University of Queensland

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Lyndal Sleep profile picture

Dr Lyndal Sleep

Affiliate,
Central Queensland University

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Suzanna Fay

Dr Suzanna Fay

Senior Lecturer,
University of Queensland

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PARTNERS

University of Notre Dame-IBM Tech Ethics Lab

University of Notre Dame-IBM Tech Ethics Lab

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Mapping automated decision-making tools in administrative decision-making in NSW

PROJECT SUMMARY

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Mapping automated decision-making tools in administrative decision-making in NSW

Focus Areas: Social Services
Research Program: Institutions
Status: Completed

The project is a partnership between ADM+S and the New South Wales Ombudsman to map and analyse the use of automated systems in state and local government sectors in New South Wales (NSW). The project follows from a ground-breaking report on the use of technology in government decision-making published by the NSW Ombudsman in 2022.

The project will first map where and how NSW state and local government agencies are using automated systems in administrative decision processes. This is the first attempt to undertake such a systematic mapping in any jurisdiction in Australia and one of the very few attempts across the world. This first stage, led by Prof Paul Henman, Chief Investigator at ADM+S, and Dr Lyndal Sleep, Research Fellow at ADM+S, will distribute questionnaires and conduct targeted interviews with NSW state and local government agencies; building on the work from the ‘Mapping ADM in Australian Social Services’ project which mapped the use of automated systems in social security settings in Australia.

The second part of the research will be led by ADM+S Chief Investigator Prof Kimberlee Weatherall, and ADM+S Research Fellow Dr José-Miguel Bello y Villarino, which will analyse the different systems planned and in use by NSW public authorities, and the key risks and issues that emerge.

Researchers from ADM+S and Macquarie University will contribute to different legal and technical elements of the project.

The NSW Ombudsman will table a report to NSW Parliament with the findings of the research by the end of 2023.

 

This project culminated in the release of ‘Automated decision-making in New South Wales: mapping and analysis of the use of ADM systems by State and Local governments’, a report published in partnership with ADM+S and the New South Wales Ombudsman.

The report findings were presented as evidence during the first hearing of the NSW Artificial Intelligence Inquiry at Parliament House in Canberra on 8 March 2024.

Listen to Chief Researcher Prof Paul Henman on the ADM+S Podcast.

RESEARCHERS

Kimberlee Weatherall

Prof Kimberlee Weatherall

Chief Researcher, University of Sydney

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Paul Henman

Prof Paul Henman

Chief Researcher, UQ

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José-Miguel Bello y Villarino

Dr José-Miguel Bello y Villarino

Principal Researcher, University of Sydney

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ADM+S Member

C. Allan

Principal Project Officer, NSW Ombudsman’s Office

ADM+S Member

K. Whitworth

Senior Project Officer, NSW Ombudsman’s Office

Lyndal Sleep profile picture

Dr Lyndal Sleep

Associate Researcher,
Central Queensland University

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Jenny van der Arend

Dr Jenny van der Arend

Senior Research Assistant, UQ

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Jeffrey Chan

Assoc Prof Jeffrey Chan

Associate Researcher

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Terry Carney

Prof Terry Carney

Senior Researcher, University of Sydney

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Scarlet Wilcock

Dr Scarlet Wilcock

Associate Researcher, University of Sydney

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Rita Matulionyte

Dr Rita Matulionyte

Associate Researcher, Macquarie University

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Distinguished Professor Julian Thomas

Dist. Prof Julian Thomas

Advisory Board Member, RMIT University

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PARTNERS

NSW Ombudsman

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The Coronavirus Impact

PROJECT SUMMARY

COVID19 Stay safe on mobile device

The Coronavirus Impact

Focus Areas: News and Media, Transport and Mobility, Health, and Social Services
Research Program: Data
Status:
Completed

This project focused on a publication output: a themed issue of the journal New Media & Society. Our theme proposal was accepted and the theme issue is in its final stages pre-publication. We are still waiting for comments on one article, but 10 articles have been accepted for publication by the journal and the introduction has been written. We are only waiting for the decision on the last outstanding article before submitting the complete package to the editors for final review. The entire issue ended up being written by Centre members.

The focus of the issue is on the range of roles played by automated decision making systems in the pandemic response. These range from the automated curation of news content to automated contact tracing and air quality management. Contributions came from all four focus areas of the Centre. The timeframe for the issue enabled the inclusion of articles that tracked the shift from pandemic to endemic and an analysis of the ways in which systems developed in response to the pandemic persisted or faded away.

RESEARCHERS

Mark Andrejevic

Prof Mark Andrejevic

Lead Investigator,
Monash University

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ADM+S Associate Director Jean Burgess

Prof Jean Burgess

Chief Investigator,
QUT

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ADM+S Chief Investigator Heather Horst

Prof Heather Horst

Chief Investigator,
Western Sydney University

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ADM+S Chief Investigator Sarah Pink

Prof Sarah Pink

Chief Investigator,
Monash University

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Gerard Goggin

Prof Gerard Goggin

Associate Investigator,
Western Sydney University

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Prof Ariadna Matamoros-Fernandez

Associate Investigator,
QUT

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Michael Richardson

Assoc Prof Michael Richardson

Associate Investigator,
UNSW

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Georgia Van Toorn

Dr Georgia van Toorn

Associate Investigator,
UNSW

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Rowan Wilken

Assoc Prof Rowan Wilken

Associate Investigator,
RMIT University

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Christopher O'Neill

Dr Christopher O’Neil

Research Fellow,
Monash University

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Dr Silvia Montaña-Niño profile picture

Dr Silvia Montaña-Niño

Affiliate,
University of Melbourne

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PARTNERS

Australian Red Cross Logo

Australian Red Cross

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OVIC Logo

Victorian Information Commissioner

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Data & Society Research Institute (US)

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Data mapping and ADM to advance humanitarian action and preparedness

PROJECT SUMMARY

Volunteer charity workers

Data mapping and ADM to advance humanitarian action and preparedness

Focus Areas: News & Media, Social Services
Research Program: Data
Status: Completed

Humanitarian organisations and other NGOs are undergoing significant digital transformation. In a complicated digital media environment, new analytics capabilities can improve the role and effectiveness of organisations like Australian Red Cross in building community resilience, expanding volunteer networks, and informing rapid response. New models are needed for building data capability within communities prone to disaster and emergency. This includes community-driven practices for gathering useful open access data and local knowledge to aid and automate decision-making in disaster preparedness.

This project aimed to explore the potential of data partnerships and local community data capability for improving humanitarian preparedness and response to emergency situations. It contributes to developing new techniques for improving data-driven mapping of community strengths, knowledge and resilience. The work will improve advocacy and preparedness and enhance Red Cross’s data analytics capability as the organisation seeks to work with and empower local communities.

The project’s interim report, Mapping Community Resources for Disaster Preparedness: Humanitarian Data Capability and Automated Futures, sets out background knowledge about open data and mapping practices for disaster response, prediction and preparedness. Building on stakeholder workshops and international collaboration, the Mapping Community Resources report presents a model for community-oriented, open access and strengths-based data mapping capability.

PUBLIC RESOURCES

Volunteers packing boxes into a van

Open Source Software: Community Resource Mapping Platform

Target audience: Researchers, Software Developers
Content type: Dataset

View on Github

PUBLICATIONS

Towards resilient communities: data capability and resource mapping for disaster preparedness, 2023

McCosker, A., Shaw, F., Kang, Y.B.

Report

Mapping Community Resources for Disaster Preparedness: Humanitarian Data Capability and Automated Futures, 2022

McCosker, A., Shaw, F., Calyx, C., Kang, Y.B.

Report

RESEARCHERS

ADM+S Chief Investigator Anthony McCosker

Assoc Prof Anthony McCosker

Lead Investigator,
Swinburne University

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Daniel Angus

Prof Daniel Angus

Chief Investigator,
QUT

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Kath Albury

Prof Kath Albury

Associate Investigator,
Swinburne University

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Jane Farmer

Prof Jane Farmer

Associate Investigator,
Swinburne University

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Rowan Wilken

Assoc Prof Rowan Wilken

Associate Investigator,
RMIT University

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ADM+S Investigator Ivana Jurko

Ivana Jurko

Partner Investigator,
Red Cross Australia

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PARTNERS

Australian Red Cross Logo

Australian Red
Cross

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Data Ethics, Rights, and Markets

PROJECT SUMMARY

Blurred people moving

Data Ethics, Rights, and Markets

Focus Areas: News and Media, Transport and Mobility, Health, and Social Services
Research Program: Data
Status: Active

The goal of this project is to contribute to the theoretical “backbone” of the ADM+S Centre and help synthesise the findings from projects in different focus areas and research programs through the creation of an historically informed theoretical overview to the social issues associated with the rise of automated decision-making (ADM).

The project supplements the descriptive mapping project (typologies and taxonomies of ADM) with an issue mapping project that connects directly with the core social concerns of the Centre: fairness, ethics, inclusion, and effectiveness.

RESEARCHERS

Distinguished Professor Julian Thomas

Prof Julian Thomas

Lead Investigator,
RMIT University

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ADM+S Associate Director Jean Burgess

Prof Jean Burgess

Chief Investigator,
QUT

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Axel Bruns, Chief Investigator with the ADM+S Centre

Prof Axel Bruns

Chief Investigator,
QUT

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Jake Goldenfein

Dr Jake Goldenfein

Chief Investigator,
University of Melbourne

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Paul Henman

Prof Paul Henman

Chief Investigator,
University of Queensland

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ADM+S Chief Investigator Anthony McCosker

Assoc Prof Anthony McCosker

Chief Investigator,
Swinburne University

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ADM+S Investigator Christine Parker

Prof Christine Parker

Chief Investigator,
University of Melbourne

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Sarah Pink

Prof Sarah Pink

Chief Investigator,
Monash University

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ADM+S Chief Investigator Mark Sanderson

Prof Mark Sanderson

Chief Investigator,
RMIT University

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Kimberlee Weatherall

Prof Kimberlee Weatherall

Chief Investigator,
University of Sydney

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ADM+S Chief Investigator Megan Richardson

Prof Megan Richardson

Affiliate,
University of Melbourne

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PARTNERS

Australian Red Cross Logo

Australian Red Cross

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Data & Society Research Institute (US)

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OVIC Logo

Victorian Information Commissioner

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Automated Decision-Making Empirical Mapping Project

PROJECT SUMMARY

Blurred people crossing street

Automated Decision-Making Empirical Mapping Project

Focus Area(s): News & Media, Social Services, Health, Transport & Mobilities
Research Program: Institutions
Status: Active

This project explores the complex interplay between automated decision-making (ADM) and generative artificial intelligence (GAI) technologies and the Australian labour market, utilising key variables such as geography, industry, sector, and occupation among others. The main objectives involve the development of a theoretical categorisation of AI systems, followed by its empirical application using statistical data from Australia (e.g. ABS labour and business surveys). Our goal is to map the influences of AI technologies across the economy, taking into consideration machine exposure (i.e., via efficiency, competency, or autonomy), human insulation (i.e., ability advantages), and institutional barriers (i.e., regulatory risks). 

Key outputs include an AI system taxonomy, a multifaceted scoring system for evaluating the interplay between machine and human tasks, and a database monitoring potential AI adoption and impact across various sectors. These are used for granular analysis of the potential risks and advantages associated with AI integration, identifying areas of high complementarity between technology tools and workers and areas of high susceptibility to machine substitution. 

Project outcomes provide a nuanced understanding of AI’s impact on the Australian labour market, establishing a predictive framework for future work dynamics. Our findings contribute significantly to businesses, academic research, and policy development by generating a detailed impact map of AI across industries. These insights could inform strategic actions, optimising AI benefits and mitigating risks, and shaping workforce development initiatives. Additionally, this project contributes to the broader discourse on AI’s ethical and societal implications by advocating a balanced approach to AI integration in the Australian labour market, thereby promoting harmonious human-machine coexistence and laying the groundwork for a prosperous, AI-enhanced future. 

PUBLICATIONS

Large Language Models Reduce Agency Costs, 2023

Ilyushina, N., Potts, J., et al.

Journal article

Profiting from data commons – Theory, evidence and strategy implications, 2023

Potts, J., et al.

Journal article

Decentralised autonomous organisations: A new research agenda for labour economics, 2022

Ilyushina, N., MacDonald, T.

Journal article

RESEARCHERS

ADM+S Chief Investigator Jason Potts

Prof Jason Potts

Lead Investigator,
RMIT University

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Paul Henman

Prof Paul Henman

Chief Investigator,
University of Queensland

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Distinguished Professor Julian Thomas

Prof Julian Thomas

Chief Investigator,
RMIT University

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ADM+S Investigator Ivana Jurko

Ivana Jurko

Partner Investigator,
Red Cross Australia

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ADM+S Chief Investigator Megan Richardson

Prof Megan Richardson

Affiliate,
University of Melbourne

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PARTNERS

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Australian Red Cross

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